8 Tips for Sustainable and Ethical Food Choices

Are you interested in making sustainable and ethical food choices, but not sure where to begin? Don’t worry; you’re not alone! Navigating the modern moral landscape of food can be challenging for many. However, even small changes to your daily habits can significantly impact your well-being, the environment, and the economy.

 

At Salt & Company, our mission is to nurture the joy of cooking and share flavours and cultures with present and future generations. Since our establishment in 2016, we have embraced a ‘reducetarian’ approach, prioritising premium, higher welfare, and fresh locally-sourced ingredients. Our journey has been one of continuous learning and growth, as we strive to refine our practices every day.

 

Here are 8 tips to help you make sustainable and ethical food choices:

 

1. Shop locally and independently.

Whenever possible, try to shop at local and independent stores for your food. These stores often offer a greater variety of quality ingredients and artisanal products, and they help to support local farmers and small producers. Not only will you be able to discover new and unique flavours, but you’ll also have the opportunity to connect with the passionate experts who bring these products to you. Plus, shopping locally helps to circulate knowledge, bring joy and inspiration to your meals, and strengthen the bonds of your community. It’s worth noting that not all independent and local stores offer sustainable and ethical products; so it’s important to make inquiries about shops and sustainable/ethical products that might be of interest to you.

 

2. Choose fresh produce from local markets or green grocers.

Fresh produce is best purchased from local markets, green grocers, or independently-owned supermarkets. A good green grocer works closely with farmers and wholesale markets to bring you a selection of quality produce at reasonable prices that don’t harm local farmers. Plus, shopping with a green grocer gives you access to unique and seasonal fruit and vegetable varieties that you might not find at corporate supermarkets.

 

3. Buy dry goods in smaller quantities.

When it comes to dry goods like nuts, grains, flours, and dried fruits, try to buy from stores that offer these ingredients as loose produce, sold by the gram. This allows you to purchase exactly the amount you need, reducing food waste and ensuring that your ingredients are fresh.

 

4. Pay attention to where your meat comes from.

To reduce your environmental impact and support more ethical farming practices, it’s important to pay attention to where your meat comes from and how it was raised. Consider reducing your meat portions and making beef a “sometimes” option, as most beef has a much larger carbon footprint than chicken for instance. This may also allow you to afford higher welfare, premium grade meats when you do choose to cook with meat. For our cooking classes, we source all of our meats from the third-generation, family-owned Torre Butchers in Northbridge, they are one of the best butchers in Perth with a focus on top quality produce. 

 

5. Choose sustainable seafood options.

Human overfishing and mass fish farming are major threats to our oceans and the habitats of marine animals. To make sustainable seafood choices, try to purchase from a trusted fishmonger or seafood market that can tell you where the fish was caught and how it was raised. You can also consider choosing seafood that is sustainably farmed or caught using methods that have minimal impact on the environment.

 

6. Reduce your dairy consumption.

The livestock industry has a significant environmental impact, and dairy consumption is a part of that. To reduce your environmental footprint, try to diversify your dairy choices by using non-cow’s milk dairy or nut milk whenever possible. You can also try reducing dairy in your everyday cooking without compromising on flavour. It is worth noting that not all non-cows milks and nut milks are necessarily sustainable or ethical, so it’s a good idea to do a little research before choosing your alternative.

 

7. Choose higher welfare eggs.

If you love delicious food, buying higher welfare eggs is a no-brainer. Not only are these eggs more humane, but they also often taste better and have more nutrients than conventionally raised eggs. We use Pasture Raised or ‘Pastured’ eggs in all of our cooking classes. This is the highest grade of welfare in Australia, and guarantees chicken welfare and egg quality.

 

8. Get in touch with your community.

We are always trying to improve our sourcing and practices to do better, so feel free to share any environmentally-friendly tips and tricks you have.

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